To to be able to grow and advance throughput

To begin to amplify the spectrum ofincreasing the safety of players on the ice, and addition to facts given, it isvery importance that equipment, core of safety is put into play. One way to describea comparison between how hockey injuries and real-life situations co-exist isIce Hockey and riding a motor cycle, this article states, “both areincreasingly popular activities in the United States, and both are associatedwith high risks of head and facial injuries.”(pg.

) This statement sums up the listof how to compare this topic. One way to combat head injuries is using helmets.In the pediatric study called “Hockey Helmets, Face Masks, and Injurious Behavior”,this article goes in depth on how certain factors that may contribute toinjurious behaviors, and how the medical community can play a role inadvocating change within the sport. Within the journal, the two authors TennaM.

Murray and Lori A. Livingston heavily stress on the fact that “Reduction inincidence of head and face injuries with the use of mandatory protection” and “Contributionof wearing head and facial protection to the development of players’ injuriousbehavior.” (Murray, Livingston) with these statements, which to most could beconfusing, but in all honesty, it explains that with the cost of voluntaryinvolvement of using helmets, it can be the best for a player to be able togrow and advance throughput his/her career, but is it the safe option? Evenwith the skater’s helmets being of concern, another player, the goalie, must bespeficily careful of his requirement since they are the only player that is onthe ice from the entire game.

In the journal article “A comparison of the capacityof ice hockey goaltender masks for the protection from puck impacts”, theresearch that this study conducted showed that “A hybrid III head form wasfitted with four different goaltender masks and impacted with a hockey puck inthree locations at 25 m/s. The masks were found to vary in the level ofprotection they offered as the mask with the thickest liner resulted in lowerforces than the thinnest mask for side impacts: however, the thinnest maskresulted in the lowest force for the front impacts…Despite performancedifferences at specific locations, no one mask proved to be superior as peakacceleration and peak force values did not exceed the thresholds necessary forconcussion.” () This only shows that regardless of what position you have onthe ice, either a forward or goalie, it should be considered that we must find strongerand more upgraded system to the safety of helmets, regardless of what positionthe individual is on. Leagues and manufacturers need to try to find a better andsafer alternative to the standards we have today and to address these troubledareas on the masks and helmets so they can ensure that the player is completelyguaranteed that his/her head, and overall body protection is safe.